Theatrephonic presents:
‘And the Angels Sing’
“Permission to Land, G-George”

‘What was he like? George I mean?’
‘Most of the boys prefer to call me Skipper or Skip,’ he told us. ‘None of this Sir. All first names on my plane.’ George was only 26 years old.

‘What did they mean by angels, daddy?’
Don’t get any romantic illusions. These bombers were built to stop the Germans. And they were cold, cramped and uncomfortable. And there’s never a day goes by when I don’t think of all the people who died as a consequence of the bombings. After the war we were made to feel as though all those lives were wasted. Like we didn’t matter.

And The Angels Sing is a very moving account of one man’s experience of being in the Air Force during the Second World War, part of the bomber command. But it was not until 2012 that they were recognised for playing their part in the war. Finally recognised for helping to win the war.

Written by Nigel Foster
Adapted from the accounts and journals of Peter Foster
Directed by Emmeline Braefield @ebraefield

With:
Gareth Turkington @gareth.turkington as Paul  
Emmeline Braefield @ebraefield as Andy
John Cooper-Evans @johncooper_evans  as George
And
Ashley Shiers as Other Air Crew and Spilsby Control

Music:
Austrian Army by The United States Marine Band
Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture by The United States Marine Band
The Thunderer by The United States Marine Band
Alone with My Thoughts by Esther Abrami
And the Angels Sing by Bing Crosby
Taps Bugle Call by The United States Marine Band

The Theatrephonic Theme tune was composed by Jackson Pentland
Performed by
Jackson Pentland
Mollie Fyfe Taylor
Emmeline Braefield

Cat on a Piano Productions produce and edit feature films, sketches and radio plays.

Their latest project is called @Theatrephonic, a podcast of standalone radio plays and short stories performed by professional actors. You can catch Theatrephonic on Spotify and other platforms.

For more information about the Theatrephonic Podcast, go to catonapiano.uk/theatrephonic, Tweet or Instagram @theatrephonic, or visit their Facebook page.

And if you really enjoyed this week’s episode, listen to Theatrephonic’s other plays and short stories and consider becoming a patron by clicking here…

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